2022 Bridgerton Spitfire Audio Competition Entry

This was my entry for the rework of a Brigerton clip for the Spitfire Audio Competition.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CYOX79ahJp8?si=1h03s0coKLkdC_6R" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen></iframe>

This is my submission for Spitfire Audio’s Bridgerton Scoring Competition. I have mostly used Spitfire Audio’s BBC Symphony library with just a few tiny additions of Logic Pro’s in-built instrument libraries.

Daphne has a motif played on the clarinet that adapts to the different moods. We know that it’s more complicated than “marrying for love”, so I wanted there to be some doubt in the melody at the beginning with the flattened 7th, but in the ‘dressing’ scene, it is sharpened to be more joyful.

I aimed to tempo-match the footsteps of the queen, with gravitas being depicted by deep double-bass pizzicato. The Whistledown Newsletter has a sort of theme of its own, which I wanted to sound like gossiping, or hens clucking, depicted by short repeated staccato notes played on quirky scalic patterns. The little piccolo ‘flourish’ after the “Has something happened?” line is almost an echo of the exquisite shoe-squeak that can be heard in the silence!

This is my submission for Spitfire Audio’s Bridgerton Scoring Competition. I have mostly used Spitfire Audio’s BBC Symphony library with just a few tiny additions of Logic Pro’s in-built instrument libraries. Daphne has a motif played on the clarinet that adapts to the different moods. We know that it’s more complicated than “marrying for love”, so I wanted there to be some doubt in the melody at the beginning with the flattened 7th, but in the ‘dressing’ scene, it is sharpened to be more joyful. I aimed to tempo-match the footsteps of the queen, with gravitas being depicted by deep double-bass pizzicato. The Whistledown Newsletter has a sort of theme of its own, which I wanted to sound like gossiping, or hens clucking, depicted by short repeated staccato notes played on quirky scalic patterns. The little piccolo ‘flourish’ after the “Has something happened?” line is almost an echo of the exquisite shoe-squeak that can be heard in the silence! Finally, for the sisters’ banter at the end, I chose instruments playing high in their register for that light youthful sound, with Daphne’s theme threading through a lighter version of the gossip motif.